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. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, our commitment to the gulf, and to america, has never been st
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> ron brown's in "the national journal" wrote, the main reason obama is doing better in battleground states has to do with his increase from white working women. working class women. keep in mind, back in 2008, nationally, obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, the number hovers in those cases around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. looking good for the president with white working class women. what an interesting category to be moving ahead in. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." today we saw a blow to the nationwide republican effort to suppress democratic turnout. a pennsylvania judge blocked a strict voter photo i.d. requirement from going into effect before election day. judge robert simpson wrote in part, i am not still -- i am not still convinced that there will be no voter disenfranchisement ar
gives you an idea of how much the country has changed in a good way. but, right after richard nixon became president, four vacancies appear on the supreme court. you never know how that will work. jimmy carter was the only proven to serve a full term without having a single nominee. but richard nixon was on the president for five and a half years. you will recall he had to leave early remember. [laughter] but he got for appointments in the supreme court because chief justice warren left, john hollen and hugo black left and they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, lewis powell and william rehnquist and as you think about that list, it illustrates the scene that i think is a very in part and part of the oath but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it's the most important story in the supreme court because moderate republicans dominated the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. they
. i'd say no more lies, no more apologies, no more coverups. retched nixon lied because of coverups and bill clinton i am protested because of lies and coverups, where is the accountability in this administration, own up to the fact that we are at war with an evil force never be molified or satisfied until we're all dead. this is not about political offices or expanded geopolitical orders, this is about the survival of our civilization, if this administration can't or won't lead in the battle then step aside and let someone do it who won't lie to us and endanger our children. [applause] well, on friday, the office of the director of national intelligence issued a statement, attempting to put the matter to rest, going to washington is the chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge. why this document dump on a friday afternoon? >> well, you know, governor, as well as everyone else when you've got bad news, the place you put it is late on friday, what we had with the statement from director of national intelligence, a person who is a top intelligence officer in the united stat
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
, richard nixon, herbert hoover. who was on the blueprint. that is right. eisenhower. that was an easy one. i read that extensively and killing kennedy comes out on tuesday. thank you very much with putting up with me. 1998 bill clinton found also in one of the biggest presidential scandals the country had ever seen. >> i want you to listen to me. i'm going say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman. i never told anybody to lie, not a single time, never. >> bill: because of the scandal, bill clinton became a second u.s. president to be impeached. who was the first? nixon, polk, martin van burren. >> that is correct. andrew johnson. he escaped by how many votes? >> one. >> a very good. >> bill: one vote he would have been toast. alien extradition acts is most controversial u.s. laws of their time. >> in 1798 french warships seized american vessels trading with england. frightened by the possibility of invasion they passed the alien and sedition act the power to deport any alien and made citizens who criticized the government liable to arrest. >> bill: that sounds like c
of how much the country has changed in a good way. but right after richard nixon became president, for vacancies appeared on the sprinkler. you never know how that's going to work. jimmy carter is the only president in american history to serve a full term without having a single nominee. there were no vacations while he was there. richard nixon was only president for five and half years. he had to leave early, remember? [laughter] geek out for appointments because chief justice warren left. john hartman and hugo black left. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, powell, and william rehnquist. and as you think about that list, it illustrates a theme that a think, it's a very important part of "the oath" but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because modern republicans dominate the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. the
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
tuned in to watch senator john kerry -- kennedy, excuse me and vice president richard nixon face off in thestl vafted presidentipre-- televised presidential debate. you know the story. the tanned john f. kennedy and then richard nixon. >>> as w rorted thekeye ate batones today. both mitt romney and president obama in that crucial battleground state. here's romney moments ago ins we terville, ohio, where he wrapped up an event with golfing legend jack nicklaus. >> after the debates and the campaigns and all the ads are overepl in ohio are going to say loud and clear on november 6th, we can't do four more years. we must do better. good morning, all. >> good morning, chuck. >> let's start where where things stand in ohio. we have a whole bunch of polls. saw new york times, quinnipiac polls. they show giant leads, eye-popping if you wi. the esidt teoi u , points up in florida, 12 in pennsylvania. i don't know why they have pennsylvania. i think we've all moved it off e battleground. susan page, cat leads but we can't debate who's leading. >> in ohio it seems clear that this is a state t
victory for president lyndon johnson, richard nixon got a landslide victory in 1972, but a landslide democratic majority in the house and senate and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still fairly and the control of liberal democrats. 4 two brief shining years or perhaps baleful years if you don't like the great society but for two years for better or for worse the united states had a government in the way that we often seek of her majesty, having a government that is a group of people who can implement a party platform that can be judged at the next election or serious elections. that is not generally the way the united states operates. courtesy of the constitution drafted in 1787 and what i want to in sister relatively unamended thereafter with regard to the basic structures we live under. the republican president, president johnson, nixon, ford, reagan and george h. w. bush not for a single day had even a single house of congress from their own political party. ronald reagan did have the senate for four years but he never had a full congress that was r
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
that first debate john kennedy on the stage with richard nixon and he was considered the winner of that on tv, not on radio, but that's where people were watching and then i think in 1976 in terms of a major gaffe when gerald ford who the president, hadn't been elected, richard nixon resigned, said that there was no domination by the soviet union of eastern europe. those are the two highlights, but that's a very rare occasion where a debate actually determines an election. >> let me ask you about this. both candidates seem to be praising each other lowering debate expectations. we're hearing mitt romney has been rehearsing zingers. the president has been rehearsing delivering shorter answers in this debate. what does each man need to do to convince the american public he's the right man for the job. let's start with president obama. >> president obama needs to just look presidential, not look flustered, not give any lines like hillary, you're likeable enough which seemed to demonstrate a certain arrogance or smugness or putting down anybody else. mitt romney has to be aggressive and has to ma
, if this issue really gets traction that it deserves, and let it say it deserves, go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people who are dead because of this. there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. and it doesn't matter what the policies are. bill: you're 30 days out from here, under 40 days. how does libya factor in the national discussion? >> the bigger issue is not just what happened in libya. that is huge. the fact that an ambassador was assassinated is huge. the bigger issue, why didn't this white house, why did not this administration all of its various surrogates tell us the truth? they knew the truth. they just didn't tell it. and they have covered it up. in the same way they didn't tell us the truth about the fort hood shooter and didn't tell us the truth about the shooter in little rock who killed a soldier standing outside of a recruiting station. there is much to be held, they should be held accountable f
that he gave while richard nixon continuously lost ground thereafter. the story goes that it was kennedy's tan, his youthful look that won him the first televised debate. do you think that's the full story? >> i think that's part of an lore. i think much more was this. before that first debate john kennedy was thought of as a young, not very distinguished absentee senator, junior senator from massachusetts debating against the vice-president of the united states who had stood up to kruschev. this marvelous debater. kennedy was able to not only match nixon but exceed him. people began to think of him as a possible president. >> are debates necessary for the democratic process? have the best debaters proven to be then the best presidents? >> they have in one sense. and that is one of the most important things you want from a president is someone who if he has to make a tough decision can go to americans and say, this may be unpopular with you but let me try to explain it, explain why it's the right thing to do. if a president doesn't have that he's not going to serve very well and the deba
debates. john kennedy and richard nixon how nixon loft because he didn't wear make up and looked like he didn't shave. they thought he was dark and smarmy. turns out they were right, he was. >> whether was the al gore sigh, over and over again. [ sighs ] >> exactly. before that debate, al gore was five points ahead of george burke, after the sigh, he stalled out and george bush still lost that election, but he closed in close enough for the supreme court to make the call at home plate. but, my favorite, the absolute best debate moment of all lloyd benson, 1988 versus dan quayle. >> i have as much experience in the congress as jack kennedy did when he got the presidency. >> senator i served with jack kennedy. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. [ cheers and applause ] >> that was really uncalled for senator. >> you're the one that was making the comparison, senator. >> oh, smack! >> i love that! >> and there's one more. let's keep them on a high note. there's one more not from a general election debate but from a primary just last year
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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